Recycle Your Old Analog Television Set After The Digital Switchover

Recycle Your Old Analog Television Set After the Digital Switchover

The anticipated broadcasting switch from analog to digital is finally here. Though you can request $40 coupons from the Federal Government to use toward the purchase of a digital converter box, many people are choosing to purchase a beautiful new high-definition digital television (HDTV). This means millions of old analog televisions may end up in the landfill. In this article, you’ll learn get rid of your old TV in an eco-friendly way.

Instructions

1. Why Recycle My Old TV? The very worst thing you can do with your old analog television is toss it in the dumpster. Older TVs have that heavy lead shielding around the CRT to protect you from radiation when you’re watching TV. But when that TV goes to the landfill, the lead (known to cause nervous system damage) leaches out into the environment. For this reason, many states and municipalities have banned the dumping of televisions into landfills. This is where recycling comes into play.

2. Telecommunications Industry Association’s E-cycling Central. TIA’s E-cycling Central website allows you to click on your state to see electronics recycling events and locations where you can drop off your old analog TV. Just point your web browser to http://www.eiae.org for more information.

3. Earth911.com. The quickest and easiest way to find locations that will accept your used TV for recycling is Earth911.com. Just point your web browser to http://earth911.com/electronics, type TV in the field to the right of Start Recycling, type your zip code in the next field, and click the GO button. A list of organizations and retailers where you can take your old analog TV displays.

4. Consumer Electronic Association’s myGreenElectronics.org. myGreenElectronics.org is a great resource for locating a place to drop off your old analog TV. Simply point your web browser to http://www.mygreenelectronics.org, type your zip code into the Find Recycling field on the left of your screen, and click the GO button to view a list of organizations who will recycle your used analog TV.

5. Ecyclingtools.com. Though it’s geared mainly toward businesses, ecyclingtools.com’s website provides valuable information on recycle computers and electronics. Just point your web browser to http://www.ecyclingtools.com/recycle and click on your state to view organizations who will accept your used analog TV.

6. Goodwill Industries International. You can donate your used analog TV to Goodwill. From Goodwill’s website: “Some local Goodwills train workers to refurbish and de-manufacture equipment and resell systems and components, thereby avoiding high disposal costs. Contact your local Goodwill to find out what types of electronic equipment may be donated.” Point your web browser to http://goodwill.org for more information.

7. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA is a great resource to get you started on your way to recycling your old analog TV. Just point your web browser to http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/materials/ecycling/donate.htm to go to the EPA’s e-cycling page. Here, you can view a comprehensive list of programs, retailers, and manufacturers that offer recycling services not just for TVs but also for a range of other electronics.