Replace Rotors On A 2000 F150

Every time you hit the brakes in your 2000 Ford F-150, brake pads rub against brake rotors, creating friction to slow the truck down. This friction also creates heat, and over time the brake pad and rotor material gets worn away. Stock F-150 rotors are made from cast iron, so are very hard wearing; usually they last longer than the pads. Once you have the rotors off, you have a choice of either reusing the old ones, by having the auto center machine a thin layer of the metal off them, or replacing them with a new set.

Instructions

1. Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a tire iron. Raise the F-150 with an automobile jack; chock the opposite wheels, then place the vehicle securely on jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and then the wheel.

2. Reach around the inside of the brake caliper, and locate the mounting bolts at the top and bottom. Remove the bolts with a socket wrench. Lift the caliper up and off the rotor. Suspend the caliper from the frame with a piece of wire or bungee cord to prevent stress to the rubber brake line.

3. Remove the two bolts that attach the caliper mounting bracket to the brake assembly, and then remove the bracket from the vehicle. This step is necessary only on the front brakes; the rear caliper is connected directly to the brake assembly.

4. Grab the rotor with both hands, and pull it toward you off the hub and over the lug bolts. If the rotor is rusted to the hub, tap it with a rubber mallet while turning the rotor.

5. Prepare the new rotor by spraying it with brake parts cleaner to remove the grease applied during shipping. Wipe any excess cleaner off with a paper towel.

6. Replace the rotor over the lug bolts and onto the hub.

7. Reassemble the caliper mounting bracket and caliper. Replace the wheel, then tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-lbs. with a torque wrench. Move to the next wheel and repeat the process.


Replace Rotors On A 2000 F150

Every time you hit the brakes in your 2000 Ford F-150, brake pads rub against brake rotors, creating friction to slow the truck down. This friction also creates heat, and over time the brake pad and rotor material gets worn away. Stock F-150 rotors are made from cast iron, so are very hard wearing; usually they last longer than the pads. Once you have the rotors off, you have a choice of either reusing the old ones, by having the auto center machine a thin layer of the metal off them, or replacing them with a new set.

Instructions

1. Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a tire iron. Raise the F-150 with an automobile jack; chock the opposite wheels, then place the vehicle securely on jack stands. Remove the lug nuts and then the wheel.

2. Reach around the inside of the brake caliper, and locate the mounting bolts at the top and bottom. Remove the bolts with a socket wrench. Lift the caliper up and off the rotor. Suspend the caliper from the frame with a piece of wire or bungee cord to prevent stress to the rubber brake line.

3. Remove the two bolts that attach the caliper mounting bracket to the brake assembly, and then remove the bracket from the vehicle. This step is necessary only on the front brakes; the rear caliper is connected directly to the brake assembly.

4. Grab the rotor with both hands, and pull it toward you off the hub and over the lug bolts. If the rotor is rusted to the hub, tap it with a rubber mallet while turning the rotor.

5. Prepare the new rotor by spraying it with brake parts cleaner to remove the grease applied during shipping. Wipe any excess cleaner off with a paper towel.

6. Replace the rotor over the lug bolts and onto the hub.

7. Reassemble the caliper mounting bracket and caliper. Replace the wheel, then tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-lbs. with a torque wrench. Move to the next wheel and repeat the process.